The Weber School's online student newspaper

The RamPage

Divide album review

Harris Helberg, Editor-in-Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Songwriter and musician Ed Sheeran’s highly anticipated album ÷ (Divide), released on March 3, continuing Sheeran’s theme of naming his albums after mathematical operations like X (Multiply) and + (Plus). His new twelve-song album, with four bonus tracks on the deluxe edition, strongly embraces elements of the past, present, and future.

Ed Sheeran doesn’t break any new ground on Divide, but it has many admirable qualities.  Divide will not challenge any fan of his two previous, major label albums.  The melodies he presents are as expected of him, however, he has a high bar set for himself.  Love is the medium for all of Sheeran’s ideas; you can hear about friendship, family, relationships, politics, and fame in his romantic delivery.  Sheeran shows this on songs like “Perfect” and “How Would You Feel (Paean).”  One could describe him as horribly sentimental and cliche, while others tend to take an interpretive role as a listener and apply it to their own lives.  The song “What Do I Know?” turns to the future when Sheeran sings, “We could change this whole world with a piano/ Add a bass, some guitar, grab a beat/ And away we go.” This song sends the message that every person has the ability to change the world.  Once again, cliche, but exactly what Ed Sheeran promotes.

One could describe him as horribly sentimental and cliche, while others tend to take an interpretive role as a listener and apply it to their own lives.

Sheeran’s vocals stand out in songs like “Dive” and “Happier,” and many songs seem to fit with Sheeran’s usual style, which consists of guitar, vivid lyrics, and occasional rapping.  Bonus tracks  “Barcelona” and “Bibia Be Ye Ye” have definitely been influenced by Sheeran’s international travels; he took a break with social media (which saddened and shocked plenty of his close fans) and is reflecting his experiences overseas.

This album was met with some tough criticism from publications like Pitchfork, expressing that “Ed Sheeran sells trite innocence by the pound. He uses bland wisdom and unimaginative music to ponder the basic good and bad in people around him, without once looking inward.”  While this is somewhat applicable, the face value of what Ed Sheeran presents is good music.  At the very core, it does sound pleasant.

This album covers a range of emotions, from burning, sadness, and elation.  Ed Sheeran is a businessman of emotion and his fans eat it up.  He is a seller at heart.  All things considered, I would give this album a 6/10.  I would love to see Ed Sheeran shake things up his next album.

This album covers a range of emotions, from burning, sadness, and elation.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

Comments are closed.

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    This Year’s Winter Fashion

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    Styles of writing: MLA, AP and Chicago NB

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    It’s the great pumpkin, Weber Rams

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    Yearlong project for juniors: American Humanities Experience

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    Event brings top journalists to Atlanta

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    Supreme Court justice, senator among authors at upcoming book festival

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    Where are they now: Weber valedictorians

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    Sukkot: a look inside the hut

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    Pumpkin everything: fall edition

  • Divide album review

    Arts & Culture

    Students go crazy over Music Midtown